Don’t Write for “Validation”, That’s Bad Business

Edan writes over at TheMillions.com about why NOT self-publish. He lays out 8 logical reasons (to him) that back up his decisions. Fine, you can, and should, do whatever you want.

But… let’s not pretend this is more than what it’s really about, and that is validation. Because your arguments don’t make sense to a business person. Don’t like Amazon? Too bad. You want to sell a lot of books, you must play with them in their sandbox. It’s the same thing as people who tell me they hate Google and won’t play by their rules. That’s just stupid. Fine, if you won’t play with them, then you can’t run a business the best you can.

Writing books for validation is just bad business, and that’s what bothers people like me about when people like Edan give bogus reasons why they won’t self-publish. At least admit it. It’s about validation for you. If you were a business person, with a business mindset, you’d look at the legacy model and run screaming, or laughing.

But you don’t look at it that way, and that’s fine with me/us, just own the real reasons and not pretend it’s anything else. JR nailed it in the comments.

You know there are a lot of reasons for deciding to go with traditional publishing rather than self-publishing. What I am sorry to see is people making the decision based more on emotion, prejudice and ignorance than facts. And I’m sorry, but that is what you are doing here if your list is honest.

For example, your first one, that you are not a self-hater made me go, huh? And then I read the whole thing. What were you really saying? That you need validation from a corporation for your writing. That you can’t get enough validation from readers and if a company doesn’t tell you a writer, then you aren’t. I would say that you already — if not hate yourself — then don’t have much respect for yourself. I’m sorry that you are making an important business decision on such a need for validation rather than what may be best for you as a writer.

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  1. […] and publish. I’m finding that there are a lot of authors who think just like artists. They write for validation, instead of writing for business […]